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Clinical Image
1 (
2
); 107-108
doi:
10.25259/WJWCH_17_2022

Photographing surgical specimens the correct way

Department of Pediatric Surgery, BJ Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Corresponding author: Arka Banerjee, Department of Pediatric Surgery, BJ Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. arkabanerjee6989@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Banerjee A. Photographing surgical specimens the correct way. Wadia J Women Child Health 2022;1(2):107-8.

Surgical specimens are often photographed as a record-keeping exercise for lectures, other forms teaching, publications and presentations. They serve a vital educational aid for research purpose besides teaching the operative techniques. Hence, surgeons should be aware of ways to improve the accuracy and educational value of surgical photographs.

A surgical specimen must be oriented in an anatomically appropriate position and photographed using appropriate lighting and dimensionality. It should be devoid of shadows and other peripheral distractions. The background surface should be neutral and wiped clean of blood, bile, or ink. The specimen surface should be cleaned by rinsing under running water. Any ink or tissue fragments should be wiped off. Instead of using hands or fingers on in the photograph, hemostats, probes, or forceps should be used to hold or demonstrate a region of interest [Figure 1]. A clean ruler or label, preferably with an identifying number, should always be included in the same plane of focus, without touching or overlapping the specimen [Figure 2].

Figure 1:: Faulty photography of surgical specimens – (a) dirty background, specimen held with fingers, (b) infant feeding tube used instead of scale, (c) scale not seen completely, and (d) specimen in kidney tray with numerous peripheral distractions.
Figure 2:: Correctly photographed surgical specimens (Ideally, shadows should be completely avoided but fluid secretion from specimens is often unavoidable) – (a) Sacrococcygeal teratoma and (b) nephroureterectomy for a Wilms’ tumor.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patient’s identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.


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