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Clinical Image
1 (
2
); 101-102
doi:
10.25259/WJWCH_28_2022

Infantile onset achalasia cardia

Department of Paediatrics Medicine, Bai Jerbai Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Corresponding author: Ishita Mishra, Department of Paediatrics Medicine, Bai Jerbai Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. ishita.paeds@gmail.com
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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Mishra I, Priyadarshinee A, Shobhavat L. Infantile onset achalasia cardia. Wadia J Women Child Health 2022;1(2):101-2.

A 17-month-old girl, born of a third degree consanguineous union, came with the complaints of recurrent fever and cough over the past 6 months for which the patient was advised hospitalization twice. Since 9 months of age child had vomiting which would occur few minutes after feeds and would contain uncurdled milk and later was having cough after multiple episodes of vomiting. On enquiry, there was difficulty in eating solids more than liquids. Parents also noted that the child was not growing well over the past 9 months.

Examination findings revealed severe malnutrition (weight for age, height for age, and weight for height <−3SD) with respiratory findings suggestive of bronchopneumonia. An anatomical defect of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was suspected and an esophagogram was done. The passage of barium through the esophagus was obstructed at the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) where a smooth tapered narrowing was seen, suggestive of achalasia cardia [Figure 1]. To rule out Allgrove (AAA) syndrome, serum cortisol levels were done, which were normal; however, ophthalmological evaluation showed a decreased tear height.[1] Parents were counseled regarding follow-up and genetic evaluation. The child is planned for corrective surgery.

Figure 1:: Obstruction to the passage of barium seen at the GEJ as a smooth tapered narrowing (arrow) suggestive of achalasia cardia.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

  1. , . Allgrove syndrome In: StatPearls. Treasure Island: StatPearls Publishing; .
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